Latest Event Updates

Targeting Citrus Greening Disease

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UC Davis projects aim to diagnose, prevent damage caused by Huanglongbing.

Feb. 19, 2015
By Pat Bailey
University of California, Davis

Two new research projects aimed at preventing and diagnosing the devastating citrus greening disease have been launched at the University of California, Davis, funded by more than $5 million in grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA recently announced a new $30 million effort to combat the bacterial disease, also known as Huanglongbing, which is ravaging citrus groves in Florida and threatening the citrus industry throughout the U.S.

There is currently no cure for the disease, which causes citrus trees to gradually decline in health; produce bitter, misshapen fruit; and then… (Continue to full article text)

Smothered Oceans

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Rapid warming of the planet can cause ocean basins to abruptly lose oxygen, which marine life depends on. (Photo: © Chris J. Nicolini)
Rapid warming of the planet can cause ocean basins to abruptly lose oxygen, which marine life depends on. (Photo: © Chris J. Nicolini)

Extreme oxygen loss in oceans accompanied previous global climate change.

Feb. 10, 2015
By Kat Kerlin
University of California, Davis

Seafloor sediment cores reveal abrupt, extensive loss of oxygen in the ocean when ice sheets melted roughly 10,000-17,000 years ago, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The findings provide insight into similar changes observed in the ocean today.

In the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers analyzed marine sediment cores from different world regions to document the extent to which low oxygen zones in the ocean have expanded in the past, due to… (Continue to full article text)

UC Davis, Strawberry Comm. End Berry Battle

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Steve Knapp, UC Davis' new strawberry breeder, checks out the campus strawberry greenhouse. (Gregory Urquiaga | UC Davis photo)
Steve Knapp, UC Davis’ new strawberry breeder, checks out the campus strawberry greenhouse. (Gregory Urquiaga | UC Davis photo)

Settlement terms will further partnership opportunities for the UC Davis Strawberry Breeding Program & the California Strawberry Commission.

By Pat Bailey
Feb. 9, 2015
University of California, Davis

The University of California, Davis, and the California Strawberry Commission today signed an agreement for a new future for the public strawberry breeding program at UC Davis.

As part of this renewed commitment to a public breeding program that creates new varieties for California’s strawberry farmers, UC Davis announced the hiring of a new breeder for the Strawberry Breeding Program.

Steven J. Knapp, a plant scientist with highly credentialed teaching and research experience at two other U.S. land-grant universities as well as international plant genomics experience in the commercial sector, has accepted the university’s offer to lead the program.

“We are thrilled to have Steve join us as we design a new strawberry breeding program for the 21st century,” said Helene Dillard, dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, which is home to the strawberry breeding program.

“He brings with him expertise in plant genomics and genetics, as well as great breadth of experience in directing a variety of crop-breeding teams in the United States and around the world,” Dillard said.

Lawsuit settlement

Highlights of the legal settlement include further partnership opportunities for the UC Davis Strawberry Breeding Program and the California Strawberry Commission…. (Continue to full article text)

Fighting Powdery Grape Mildew

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150202_infected-grapesA new discovery by UC Davis researchers is helping combat costly grape powdery mildew damage.

By Diane Nelson
Feb 2, 2015
University of California, Davis

UC Davis researchers have uncovered important genetic clues about the pathogen that causes grape powdery mildew, among the most destructive vineyard pest throughout California and the world.

California growers use more chemicals, mostly sulfur and other fungicides, to control powdery mildew than to manage any other vineyard problem. Left untreated, powdery mildew destroys grape quality… (click here to read the entire article)

New Trellis Fund Projects Awarded

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Bob Johnson, a UC Davis graduate student, worked with farmers in Kenya on potato production, for a previous Trellis Fund project. (Photo UC Davis Horticulture Innovation)
Bob Johnson, a UC Davis graduate student, worked with farmers in Kenya on potato production, for a previous Trellis Fund project. (Photo UC Davis Horticulture Innovation)

UC Davis program selects grad students for international horticultural projects.

By Brenda Dawson
Feb. 3, 2015
University of California, Davis

The Horticulture Innovation Lab has awarded 14 new Trellis Fund projects, led by organizations in nine countries with technical support provided by grad students from three U.S. universities — including the University of Florida, North Carolina State University, and the University of California, Davis.

Nine graduate students from UC Davis have been selected to provide support to new (click to read the entire article)

Severe ‘Bird Flu’ Could Endanger Chickens

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Owners of backyard chickens who observe illness or increased mortality in their birds should call their veterinarian or the California Department of Food Agriculture. (Jessica Reeder | CC 2.0 | http://bit.ly/1It9I3c )
Owners of backyard chickens who observe illness or increased mortality in their birds should call their veterinarian or the California Department of Food Agriculture. (Jessica Reeder | CC 2.0 | http://bit.ly/1It9I3c )

California chickens have an increased risk of contracting dangerous viral strains.

Jan. 13, 2015
By Pat Bailey
University of California, Davis

UC Davis experts are urging backyard chicken enthusiasts and commercial poultry owners to practice strong biosecurity measures to prevent contact with wild birds, due to highly pathogenic strains of avian influenza recently detected in migratory waterfowl in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and Butte County, California.

The current detected strains, H5N2 and H5N8, are not a risk to human health and have not been found in commercial poultry in the United States. However, commercial poultry flocks in British Columbia and backyard flocks in Washington and Oregon have been affected.

Avian influenza — commonly called “bird flu” — is a disease found in a wide variety of domesticated and wild birds. Once introduced into an area, infection can spread through bird-to-bird contact or through contact with contaminated clothing, shoes, hands, feed, water or equipment. Because waterfowl are reservoirs for avian influenza strains that can be fatal to domestic poultry (yet often show little to no signs in waterfowl), backyard and commercial chickens raised near areas commonly used by migrating waterfowl are at risk of Read the rest of this entry »